Don’t Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs, She Thinks I’m a Piano Player in a Whorehouse

Speaking of oil. Okay, not even close, but I’ve been thinking about this book all afternoon, and I’m being kept awake waiting for an application (iSquint, if you’re interested) to finish.

The book is “Don’t Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs, She Thinks I’m a Piano Player in a Whorehouse”, and I need to see whether my father got around to reading my copy, which I left with him on my last trip home:

book cover

And it is bloody fantastic. Even by the standards of Ordinary Australian Storytelling, as far back as Henry Lawson through Slim Dusty to the Castle, this book is fantastic. If you ever happen to see a copy of it on a shelf somewhere, (especially if you’re in a departure lounge heading for your flight) I strongly recommend you pick it up. I have an enormous mental list of Great Books for Flying With – I should post it for discussion some time.

Book Description
Don’t Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs is full of dramatic action, humour and great stories. A take no prisoners’ approach to life has seen Paul Carter heading to some of the world’s most remote, wild and dangerous places as a contractor in the oil business. Amazingly, he’s survived (so far) to tell these stories from the edge of civilization.
He has been shot at, hijacked and held hostage; almost died of dysentery in Asia and toothache in Russia; watched a Texan lose his mind in the jungles of Asia; lost a lot of money backing a scorpion against a mouse in a fight to the death, and been served cocktails by an orang-utan on an ocean freighter. And that’s just his day job.
Taking postings in some of the world’s wildest and most remote regions, not to mention some of the roughest rigs on the planet, Paul has worked, got into trouble, and been given serious talkings to, in locations as far-flung as the North Sea, Middle East, Borneo and Tunisia, as exotic as Sumatra, Vietnam and Thailand, and as flat-out dangerous as Columbia, Nigeria and Russia, with some of the maddest, baddest and strangest people you could ever hope not to meet.
You will chuckle the next time you fill up the car.

Synopsis
Strap yourself in for an exhilarating, crazed, sometimes terrifying, frequently bloody funny ride through one man’s adventures in the oil trade. A take no prisoners’ approach to life has seen Paul Carter heading to some of the world’s most remote, wild and dangerous places as a contractor in the oil business. Amazingly, he’s survived (so far) to tell these stories from the edge of civilization. He has been shot at, hijacked and held hostage; almost died of dysentery in Asia and toothache in Russia; watched a Texan lose his mind in the jungles of Asia; lost a lot of money backing a scorpion against a mouse in a fight to the death, and been served cocktails by an orang-utan on an ocean freighter. And that’s just his day job. Taking postings in some of the world’s wildest and most remote regions, not to mention some of the roughest rigs on the planet, Paul has worked, got into trouble, and been given serious talkings to, in locations as far-flung as the North Sea, Middle East, Borneo and Tunisia, as exotic as Sumatra, Vietnam and Thailand, and as flat-out dangerous as Columbia, Nigeria and Russia, with some of the maddest, baddest and strangest people you could ever hope not to meet.

About the Author
Paul Carter was born in England in 1969. His father’s military career had the family moving all over the world. He has worked in the oil industry for fifteen years, re-locating every few years (old habits).When not getting into trouble on the rigs Paul lives in Sydney with two motorbikes and a daschund named Colin, visiting his father in the UK and his mother in France, and is constantly flying to all corners of the globe.

How can you not? iSquint is done – I’m off to bed.

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